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Grand Isle, Louisiana Hurricane Damage Panoramic Aerial Images

September 28, 2021  •  Leave a Comment


Hurricane Ida Damage | Grand Isle, Louisiana

September 25, 2021  •  Leave a Comment

Hurricane Ida was a deadly and destructive Category 4 Atlantic hurricane that became the second-most damaging and intense hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. state of Louisiana on record, behind Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In terms of maximum sustained winds at landfall (150 mph (240 km/h)), Ida tied 2020's Hurricane Laura and the 1856 Last Island hurricane as the strongest on record in the state.[1] The storm also caused catastrophic flooding across the Northeastern United States. Ida is the sixth-costliest tropical cyclone on record, having caused at least $50.1 billion (2021 USD) in damages,[2][3] of which $18 billion was in insured losses in Louisiana, and of which $100 million was in Cuba, $584 million dollars in agriculture damage, surpassing Hurricane Ike of 2008CoreLogic estimated that Ida caused an estimated $16 to 24 billion in flooding damage in the Northeastern United States, making it the costliest storm to hit the region since Hurricane Sandy in 2012,[4] with an estimated $44 billion dollars in Insured loss.[5] The ninth named storm, fourth hurricane, and second major hurricane of the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, Ida originated from a tropical wave in the Caribbean Sea on August 23. On August 26, the wave developed into a tropical depression, which organized further and became Tropical Storm Ida later that day, near Grand Cayman. Amid favorable conditions, Ida intensified into a hurricane on August 27, just before moving over western Cuba. A day later, the hurricane underwent rapid intensification over the Gulf of Mexico, and reached its peak intensity as a strong Category 4 hurricane while approaching the northern Gulf Coast, with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 929 millibars (27.4 inHg). On August 29, the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Ida made landfall near Port Fourchon, Louisiana, devastating the town of Grand Isle. Louisiana. Ida weakened steadily over land, becoming a tropical depression on August 30, as it turned northeastward. On September 1, Ida transitioned into a post-tropical cyclone as it accelerated through the northeastern United States, breaking multiple rainfall records in various locations before moving out into the Atlantic on the next day. Afterward, Ida's remnant moved into the Gulf of St. Lawrence and stalled there for a couple of days, before being absorbed into another developing low on September 4.

Ida knocked down palm trees and destroyed many homes in Cuba during its brief passage over the country. Throughout its path of destruction in Louisiana, more than a million people in total had no electrical power. Widespread heavy infrastructural damage occurred throughout the southeastern portion of the state, as well as extremely heavy flooding in coastal areas. New Orleans' levees survived,[6] though power line damage was extensive throughout the whole city. There was also substantial plant destruction in the state. The remnants of the storm produced a destructive tornado outbreak and catastrophic flash flooding in the Northeastern United States on September 1. Flooding in New York City prompted the shutdown of much of the transportation system.

As of September 15, a total of 112 deaths have been confirmed in relation to Ida, including 95 in the United States and 20 in Venezuela. In the United States, 33 deaths were in Louisiana, 30 in New Jersey, 18 in New York, 5 in Pennsylvania, 3 in Mississippi, 2 in Alabama, 2 in Maryland, 1 in Virginia, and 1 in Connecticut. The storm has caused 43 indirect deaths, including 20 deaths in Venezuela caused by flooding from Ida's precursor.[7] A Louisiana man was mauled to death by an alligator after walking through Ida's floodwaters,[8][9] Two electrical workers died while repairing power grid damage caused by the storm.[10] while four people died in New Orleans and Jefferson Parish as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning while using generators with inadequate ventilation.[11][12] After the storm had passed, nearly all of the oil production along the Gulf Coast was shut down. Thousands of emergency crew members were deployed in Louisiana, and hundreds of residents were rescued.[13] Power outages in the most heavily affected areas were expected to last for up to a month. States of emergency were declared for Louisiana and portions of the Northeast. Several sporting events were also moved, delayed, or cancelled due to the storm.


Louisiana Tech University - 7/27/20

August 10, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

July 2020 shots of Louisiana Tech University 


Louisiana Tech University - 3/24/20

March 24, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

March 2020 shot of Louisiana Tech University during the Global and Louisiana Coronavirus pandemic.

 


Louisiana Helicam | The Assembly | Construction Update - 2/24/17

March 24, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

These aerial panoramic images represent the latest update for the First Assembly West Monroe facility.

More information can be found within the following links:


Houmas House Aerial Photos - 12/4/19

December 08, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Houmas House Plantation and Gardens has reclaimed its position as Crown Jewel of Louisiana's River Road.

Through the vision and determination of Kevin Kelly, who fulfilled a lifelong dream by acquiring the property in the Spring of 2003, the mansion today reflects the best parts of each period in its rich history alongside the big bend in the Mississippi River.

The first owners of the plantation were the indigenous Houmas Indians, who were given a land grant to occupy the fertile plain between the Mississippi and Lake Maurepas to the north.

The Houmas sold the land to Maurice Conway and Alexander Latil in the mid 1700's
The original French Provincial house that Latil erected on the property in is situated directly behind the Mansion, adjoined by a carriageway to the grand home described during its antebellum heyday as "The Sugar Palace." The original home was later used as living quarters for the staff that served the great house. 

By the time of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, the plantation was established and producing sugar.

In 1810, Revolutionary War hero Gen. Wade Hampton of Virginia purchased the property and shortly thereafter began construction on the Mansion. However, it was not until 1825 when Hampton's daughter, Caroline, and her husband, Col. John Preston, took over the property that the grand house truly began to take shape.

Construction on the Mansion was completed in 1828. At the same time, Houmas House began to build its sugar production and continued to increase its land holdings, which ultimately grew to 300,000 acres.

Irishman John Burnside bought the plantation in 1857 for $1 million. A businessman and a character, Burnside increased production of sugar until Houmas House was the largest producer in the country, actively working the crop on 98,000 acres. During the Civil War, Burnside saved the Mansion from destruction at the hands of advancing Union forces by declaring immunity as a subject of the British Crown. In addition to building a railway to carry his products to market —"The Sugar Cane Train (1862)" — Burnside, a bachelor, is also said to have offered payment to any parents in the parish who would name their sons "John."

An avid sportsman who wagered heavily in horse races, Burnside once secretly purchased a champion thoroughbred back East with the intent of defeating the steeds of fellow local businessmen in a big race. He quietly slipped the racehorse into the billiard room of the Mansion where it was "stabled" until Burnside's surprise was unveiled at the starting line and hailed in the winner's circle.

Houmas House flourished under Burnside's ownership, but it was under a successor, Col. William Porcher Miles that the plantation grew to its apex in the late 1800's when it was producing a monumental 20 million pounds of sugar each year.

In 1927, the Mississippi came out of its banks in the epic "great flood." While Houmas House was spared, the surrounding areas were inundated. The ensuing economic havoc was but a prelude to the devastation of the Great Depression just two years later.

Houmas House Plantation withered away. The Mansion closed and fell into disrepair, a condition in which it remained until 1940 when Dr. George B. Crozat purchased it.

Crozat bought Houmas House to be a summer home away from his native New Orleans. He renovated the property with the intent to give it a more "Federal" look than the stately Greek Revival style in which it was conceived. The structure was painted white inside and out. Crown moldings and ceiling medallions were removed and both interior and exterior forms and finishes were simplified.

Eventually, the Crozat heirs opened the property to tourists. In 1963, the defining Bette Davis film "Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte" was shot in the property. The room in which Ms. Davis stayed while filming is preserved as part of today's Houmas House tour.

In addition to the Mansion and Gardens, history is also reflected in the many antique furnishings and works of art that grace the Houmas House tour. Distinguished by its two Garconierre, the Mansion exudes the warmth of a home (it's the owner's active residence), while proudly portraying its role as a landmark in American history.

Enjoy! 

PANORAMIC AERIAL IMAGE

 

 

 


Sterlington Elementary School

April 29, 2019  •  Leave a Comment


Ruston, Louisiana Tornado | Drone Video - 4/25/19

April 28, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Louisiana Helicam provided drone video services for Ruston, Louisiana tornado damage assessments.  

Statistics:

Rating: EF3
Estimated Peak Wind: 145 mph
Path Length /statute/: 6.68 miles
Path Width /maximum/: 1000.0 yards
Fatalities: 2
Injuries: 0

Start Date: 04/25/2019
Start Time: 01:47 AM CDT
Start Location: 2 SW Ruston / Lincoln Parish / LA
Start Lat/Lon: 32.5112 / -92.6729

End Date: 04/25/2019
End Time: 01:55 AM CDT
End Location: 4 NE Ruston / Lincoln Parish / LA
End Lat/Lon: 32.5702 / -92.5845


Ruston Tornado - 4/25/19

April 28, 2019  •  Leave a Comment

Certain portions of Louisiana Tech University and Ruston, Louisiana were devastated by a tornado on the morning of April 25th, 2019.

Statistics:

Rating: EF3
Estimated Peak Wind: 145 mph
Path Length /statute/: 6.68 miles
Path Width /maximum/: 1000.0 yards
Fatalities: 2
Injuries: 0

Start Date: 04/25/2019
Start Time: 01:47 AM CDT
Start Location: 2 SW Ruston / Lincoln Parish / LA
Start Lat/Lon: 32.5112 / -92.6729

End Date: 04/25/2019
End Time: 01:55 AM CDT
End Location: 4 NE Ruston / Lincoln Parish / LA
End Lat/Lon: 32.5702 / -92.5845

 

The following panoramic images show a virtual tour of the damaged region:


Mount Rushmore and Black Hills - 11/3/18

November 03, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

These shots were taken while on assignment in the Black Hills of South Dakota.

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